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Malinalco with the visiting Nebraskans

Larry & Marcia came for a Mexico visit-- look how happy & unconcerned about violence they are!! ;)

Larry & Marcia came for a Mexico visit-- look how happy & unconcerned about violence they are!! ;)

My parents from Nebraska came for a visit last month, so we decided to show them some of rural Mexico in addition to the Big Taco, D.F.  We spent a couple nights in Malinalco, located roughly 40 miles south-ish of Toluca or 60 miles (but ~2 hours) from Polanco in Mexico City.

A view of the valley of Malinalco from above

A view of the valley of Malinalco from above

Malinalco is a cute little town in a gorgeous valley that has a small archaeological site that overlooks the town from the mountainside. I would assess it as a great place for a relaxing 1-2 night stay if you’re looking to lounge about in nice, warm weather. If you are a “dooo-sy” type person, meaning someone who needs constant stimulation & multiple sites to see & activities to do, Malinalco may not be the place for you. :)

After much research on lodging, we decided to stay at Casa Mora, a fantastic B&B located just east of the main “downtown” of Malinalco. While you could walk from there to the Centro, it is a bit of a trek, partially on a dirt road, that I would imagine getting a bit toasty during the midday sun. We generally opted to drive & had no issue finding parking within a few blocks of the restaurant/archaeological site/museum area.

View of pool & backyard at Casa Mora in Malinalco

View of pool & backyard at Casa Mora in Malinalco

I completely recommmend Casa Mora, a 5-room B&B purpose-built by artist Raul Mora. The grounds/common areas are lovely, rooms airy & spacious, bathrooms modern & convenient, and pool warm & beckoning! The breakfasts are served family style with fresh-squeezed OJ, fruit, pan dulce, frijoles, a different hot dish each day, and what appeared to be real coffee (unlike the popular instant coffee so pervasive throughout Mexico!). Two honor bars, one near the pool & one in the house’s living room, offer tasty beverages to quench your thirst. And the gorgeous green yard was a perfect venue for lying on a chair with a book. During our trip, the rooms were $2000 pesos a night (inclusive of breakfast & all taxes), so although it is not a cheap option, we felt we definitely got our money’s worth. The staff were all excellent & friendly, and very responsive to our email inquiries prior to arrival (unlike other venues in town that we attempted to look into). For non-Spanish speakers, Raul speaks flawless English so you don’t have to worry about any communication barriers.

Regardless of where you choose to stay, Casa Mora’s website has a couple of great maps that should help you both in getting to Malinalco & getting around town once you arrive.

John & the in-laws enjoying some tasty beverages at Los Pilares

John & the in-laws enjoying some tasty beverages at Los Pilares

Other spots we can recommend– for restaurants, Las Palomas and Los Pilares (both very near the central town square) had excellent food & drink. Also Nieves Mallinali had fantastic ice cream– try the Galleta flavor (the Spanish word for ‘cookie’, and there were chunks of cookie stuffed throughout).  Finally, I was a bit skeptical of the Museum of Malinalco, thinking “how interesting could a museum be in a town this size?”  Surprisingly, I thought the musem was extremely well done & I would say is actually worth a visit!

Here are a few other photo highlights from our time in Malinalco.

We did some pretty intense book-reading on the lawn of Casa Mora

We did some pretty intense book-reading on the lawn of Casa Mora

I realized how long it had been since I'd had the opportunity to walk barefoot on a nice, green lawn. Larry enjoyed the brightly colored flowers that have not been seen in NE for many moons now...

I realized how long it had been since I'd had the opportunity to walk barefoot on a nice, green lawn. Larry enjoyed the brightly colored flowers that have not been seen in NE for many moons now...

Another view of the lovely pool + thatched-roof hut for outdoor dining

Another view of the lovely pool + thatched-roof hut for outdoor dining

Here's one of the bedrooms in Casa Mora, with a second door for a nice cross-breeze + garden views...

Here's one of the bedrooms in Casa Mora, with a second door for a nice cross-breeze + garden views...

Best part of the Casa Mora bedrooms? HAMMOCK IN THE BEDROOM! Brilliant.

Best part of the Casa Mora bedrooms? HAMMOCK IN THE BEDROOM! Brilliant.

Here's the crew with the tasty breakfast @ the B&B-- featuring scrambled eggs with chorizo, as well as chilaquiles (the best Mexican breakfast food ever, FYI).

Here's the crew with the tasty breakfast @ the B&B-- featuring scrambled eggs with chorizo, as well as chilaquiles (the best Mexican breakfast food ever, FYI).

The exit from Casa Mora-- it's hard to get inspired to leave...

The exit from Casa Mora-- it's hard to get inspired to leave...

Our first morning, John & I made the 400-step trek up to the Aztec archaeological site that overlooks the town. This is the map of the site

Our first morning, John & I made the 400-step trek up to the Aztec archaeological site that overlooks the town. This is the map of the site

This was the main building in the archaeological site, which was allegedly some sort of initiation site for warriors. Inside, there are animals sculpted out of the stone around a circular room; this is replicated in the Museum of Malinalco.

This was the main building in the archaeological site, which was allegedly some sort of initiation site for warriors. Inside, there are animals sculpted out of the stone around a circular room; this is replicated in the Museum of Malinalco.

Here's me with the main building + the über-steep stairs leading up towards the mountain.

Here's me with the main building + the über-steep stairs leading up towards the mountain.

We later saw this worker carrying material down aforementioned über-steep stairs... Note the intriguing-but-effective headband support system... My neck hurts just looking at him.

We later saw this worker carrying material down aforementioned über-steep stairs... Note the intriguing-but-effective headband support system... My neck hurts just looking at him.

Here's the remnants of one of the jaguars that once guarded each site of the main building.

Here's the remnants of one of the jaguars that once guarded each site of the main building.

We were lucky to visit during the season of the purple-blossomed jacarandas, which made all views around the valley a bit prettier.

We were lucky to visit during the season of the purple-blossomed jacarandas, which made all views around the valley a bit prettier.

Another view of the Malinalco valley from the archaeological site on the mountain. You can see the main street coming into town above John's head.

Another view of the Malinalco valley from the archaeological site on the mountain. You can see the main street coming into town above John's head.

And here's John being the boss on top of another Aztec building... Clearly could have intimidated many an Aztec had he lived in the right era...  This site was created around 1501.

And here's John being the boss on top of another Aztec building... Clearly could have intimidated many an Aztec had he lived in the right era... This site was created around 1501.

Here's the crew at the top of a street in downtown Malinalco.

Here's the crew at the top of a street in downtown Malinalco.

If anyone can tell me what this magical pink flower is, I am dying to know. They look like they could hardly be real!

If anyone can tell me what this magical pink flower is, I am dying to know. They look like they could hardly be real!

Here's the courtyard at the Museum of Malinalco

Here's the courtyard at the Museum of Malinalco

Here's John & I at Las Palomas

Here's John & I at Las Palomas

And as a prize for any readers who actually made it to the end of the post, here is a shot of me seducing a statue at Casa Mora. Please refrain from comment.

And as a prize for any readers who actually made it to the end of the post, here is a shot of me seducing a statue at Casa Mora. Please refrain from comment.

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14 Comments on “Malinalco with the visiting Nebraskans”

  1. #1 alice
    on Apr 12th, 2009 at 11:48 pm

    me likey malinalco very much, too!

  2. #2 Patrick
    on Apr 15th, 2009 at 9:08 pm

    Great pics. Cool blog.

  3. #3 Michelle
    on Apr 15th, 2009 at 11:30 pm

    Happy to hear you enjoyed Malinalco and Casa Mora. Genoveva and Raul are good friends and have strived to make their lovely B&B a place where you can feel good and relax.
    The pink flower is a Pseudobombax ellipticum or Pink Shaving Brush Tree.
    Here a link to some info on it :)
    http://www.rngr.net/Publications/ttsm/Folder.2003-07-11.4726/PDF.2004-03-16.0110/at_download/file
    Love your blog, btw.

  4. #4 minne
    on Apr 22nd, 2009 at 6:14 pm

    Those Midwesterners fit right in in Mexico. And did I see a blonde “Fluffy” hiding by the pool? hmmmm.
    Looks like a great time by all.

  5. #5 Lori
    on Apr 24th, 2009 at 1:12 pm

    I SHOULD GO TO MEXICO, I BET ITS ROMANTIC

  6. #6 Hayley
    on Jun 21st, 2009 at 11:17 pm

    hi, this is reguarding the hammock in the bedroom picture: My family is building a new house, and the rooms are smaller than our other house. So, i decided to save space in my room i didnt want my big bed taking up that much space and that i would just hang up a hammock! My question is, were you able to get a good nights sleep in a hammock? Or did it hang too low? Or was it unconfortable during the night? If you could answer any of these questions that would be very usefull.
    My e-mail is schaefferhayley@yahoo.com

  7. #7 alberto
    on Jan 2nd, 2010 at 2:46 pm

    Hi… just finished reading your comments about this town.. and it is great that your parents visited the area with you… It is of great interest to read the experiences of Americans in the area… I have relatives living in Toluca and they mentioned their visit to Malinalco… my curiosity directed me to seek postings on that town…and to learn more about the historical significance of the site. That is the reason why I found you comments… it will be in my list of activities to do if I visit Toluca…. the photos are great…did you found other places to stay? Do you recommend taking my car?

    Thanks…

  8. #8 Lily
    on Jan 7th, 2010 at 6:43 pm

    Hello there, It is nice to see Americans enjoy this town as much as we do, My grandmother was raised in a little town just south of there and every time I visit I have to stop in Malinalco, which is just beautiful.. I’m glad you enjoyed it a wrote a positive note on it which quite frankly is hard to find .

  9. #9 Joy
    on Feb 15th, 2010 at 12:48 pm

    Hey, I discovered that the pink flower in latin is:
    “pseudobombax ellipticum”

    or in nahuatl:
    xiloxochitl

    in spanish:
    cabellin

  10. #10 Brenda
    on Mar 31st, 2010 at 3:10 pm

    Haley, Not sure if this info comes too late for you to decorate your bedroom. I have slept an entire night on the beaches of Mexcio in a hammock.. NOW.. We didn’t get much sleep since there were chickens running around and we had our German shepard dog with us actully attached to my hammock to prevent her from wondering around. Everytime a chicken got close, she would get all excited and give me a nice pull.. A lot of swinging in one night. :)
    Regarding comfort it was a bit uncomfortable since I am 5″11′ and felt pretty bent… I do think however, if you were able to put some type of cusion in the hammock and then relax it might be just perfect.
    Try before you buy would be my recommendation, but without the chickens.
    . enjoy

  11. #11 Ning
    on May 26th, 2010 at 7:14 pm

    I stumbled upon your blog because I was also dying to know the name of that pretty pink flower of Malinalco.

    I found out that it’s called Xiloxochitl, so I thought I would share it with you :)

  12. #12 Yinka
    on May 29th, 2010 at 11:39 pm

    Hi ..Thank you for an enjoyable read. I am on my way to a little place called Chalmita but I shall be stopping in Malinalco for a few days. Is it easy to find cheaper places to stay than the Casa Mora?
    Happy days

  13. #13 Noe
    on Sep 3rd, 2010 at 6:12 pm

    Malinalco esta chido, i would recommend Chalma is not far from there, taxi is like 50 pesos. Its a town with a church and a waterfall next to it lot of pilgrimages are done there. Cool Blog.

  14. #14 Arlene
    on Jan 8th, 2011 at 6:51 pm

    i also stumbled into ur blog b/c i just visited malinalco for Christmas and wanted to learn more about this town. I recommend this town b/c of its amazingly bright beautiful landscapes and theres also places where u pay to fish for the trout u want to eat that day. Amazing!!

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