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A Visit to the Great Wall!

My time in Beijing has come to end (note: 3 days ago, but the blogging is a little delayed, folks). I am (was) typing this offline while sitting in the Beijing airport, with the distinction of being the earliest passenger to arrive for my 8AM flight. I’m unclear if the guy at my hotel has just been acclimated to Americans wanting to arrive 18 hours early for flights, but it took me a mere 40 minutes to get from my hotel room to sitting at the gate (coffee in hand). Now have 1:45 to kill.

This is the most alone I've been since arriving in China

Over the last couple days, I made it to the Great Wall, Ming Tombs, Forbidden City, and saw Tiananmen Square (but got lazy & didn’t wander around through it because it was hot hot hot and I was a sweaty dog). One notable change in my travel style over the years is a steadily decreasing sense of obligation to check the box on all the big tourist sites in a given place. I would much rather people-watch, hit some markets, explore a neighborhood vs. death march through every museum listed in Lonely Planet. (Though maybe this isn’t that much of a change—I still remember my mom’s horror when friend Leigh & I traveled to Florence and skipped the Uffizi gallery, thinking our time and money would be better spent on bread/cheese/wine at the local market.)

To that end, I spend about 1.5 hours yesterday afternoon sitting in a sidewalk café on the busy Wangfujing Dajie shopping street sipping a frosty glass of Tsing Tao and soaking in the masses walking by. It felt like watching my own Chinese TV show, with the occasional foreign extra making a brief appearance. Good stuff.

Speaking of people watching, I spotted this fashion emergency: pink shirt, shorts, blue patterned socks, and yellow shoes. He was also wearing some sort of beret. This is an instance where his girlfriend is not doing her job.

After debating a blog post entitled “I Went to Beijing and Didn’t See the Great Wall,” I capitulated Tuesday night and booked a Great Wall/Ming Tombs tour at the B&B I was staying at. I was a bit reluctant, since the itinerary outlined “tours” of the Jade Factory & Silk Museum (a.k.a. forced shopping periods where your guide gets a commission for each hapless tourist he drags through). However, this seemed to be the case with the majority of tour options & I lacked the time to find a superior option with sub-24 hour advanced planning. J (And I figured that since this was one of the few organized day tours I’ve ever done, I should really have the full bullshit tour experience.)

The tour itself lived up to expectations (low), but I will say it was worth it to see the Great Wall. The drive through the Chinese countryside/small villages was also interesting, as was our tour guide’s commentary on capitalism vs. communism. “Many businessmen are lucky. They make lots of money by being lucky. This is not good for the poor people. Here, it is better for the poor people.” Additionally, our tour bus driver performed an impressive number of slow passes on blind curves, accompanied by liberal honking at any elderly bicyclist who dared to stray into our path.

First stop was the Jade Factory. After a riveting explanation by our guide about the magic of jade, we were left to our own devices in hopes that we would drop some yuan on the outrageously priced jade items on display. Lessons learned/questions wondered:

  • Which Party official did these people piss off to get stuck in the Jade-making Zoo for the day?

You can almost hear the conversation between the two old men... "I wonder what they eat in their normal habitat"

  • Similarly, someone must have lost a bet to end up as the guy forced to do his work on the old-timey foot-pedal carving machine.

Three words: hates his life.

  • The Jade Factory can be very dangerous. For instance, I was attacked by this eagle:

This bird went straight for my jugular. It was touch and go for a while.

  • And THEN I got attacked by this jaguar (or perhaps jade-uar as they are known here):

I was barely able to wrench my wrist away from his death grip.

2nd stop: Ming Tombs. Or more like Ming Tomb, #13 to be exact, and the Underground Palace. Its primary redeeming features were its green, hilly setting:

The Ming Tombs offered a nice spot away from the thicky-settled air of Beijing.

And the amount of money that tourists have scattered around the coffin of the Emperor & his two wives:

With my long monkey arms, I was tempted to reach over the glass wall & yoink some of these bills, but I figured the emperor wouldn't appreciate that.

And these sweet elephant-chair tables, under the careful watch of the Chinese guard.

This is totally what our next dining room table/chair set is going to look like.

Next stop: lunch! Watered down Chinese fare, anyone?? The food was unremarkable, but did allow me the opportunity for my first non-Western bathroom experience.

What, did you think I was *NOT* going to put a photo of a Chinese toilet in here?? Luckily my squatting muscles have been well developed on the toilet-seat-free facilities of Mexico.

Finally, it was time for the main attraction, the Great Wall at Mutianyu (http://www.mutianyugreatwall.net/)!! I chose this spot for my Wall visit as it seemed to combine convenient location (45 miles outside of Beijing) with a reputation for not being *as* touristy/busy/swamped with obnoxious vendors (as Badaling), but not quite as hard core as the 4-hour hike between Jinshanling and Simatai (as I lacked appropriate footwear/sportswear). Plus, it has TWO cable cars, a selling point on which friend Todd tipped me off. Having no other data points on which to base a comparison, Mutianyu lived up to expectations—it was indeed a Great Wall, cool mountain-y setting, cable cars/ski lifts galore, a TOBOGGAN return trip option, and lacking mobs of people.

You can see the Great Wall in the distance from my ski lift perch.

And do you know how else I know that Mutianyu was the right choice? Because TONY HAWK was there too. With his posse. I mean, I’m not one to judge, but I feel like it’s getting a little awkward the way he’s following me all around China. First my international flight & now the same spot at the same tourist attraction on the same day and time…?? Coincidence?  I think not. ;) Unfortunately he startled me coming out of a guard tower as he + posse were outbound & I was inbound, so all I managed to get were some paparazzi-esque photos of the back of his head & a profile that may or may not be him from a distance.

Red circle: Tony Hawk, carrying child. Yellow circle: one of Tony's posse who appears to be wearing a panda hat. Blue circle: fellow tourists who are more alert than I am on the quick-photo front. Green circle: possibly Tony's wife, who also did not plan well w/r/t proper footwear

The Enquirer is never going to hire me as a paparazzi at this rate.

It was drizzling a bit when we arrived at the wall, so the toboggan run was closed and we had to take the ski lift back down. Upon learning of this disappointment, I thought to myself, “My mom must have been doing a rain dance in Nebraska since she would die before supporting the idea of anyone riding this”:

How sad that we didn't get to rip down this thin metal pipe built into the Chinese mountainside.

Anyway, you’ll just have to trust me that it was cool, since my photos all suck due to the rainy/foggy weather.

It's meeee! At the Great Wall!!

Here I am with Great Wall post-rain or sweat... Let's assume rain. :)

Upon our return to the minibus, our guide informed us that it would be around a 2 hour drive back to Beijing with traffic, and since that is SUCH a long time period, their tour company requires the driver to get a rest. And where we would do that rest?? Why at the Silk “Museum”, of course!! It shouldn’t need to be said that I did not make any purchases. Rather, I was too busy feeling sorry for the girl whose job it is to pull silkworm pupae out of their silky little shells all day in front of gawking tourists, and then soak/stretch the silk over increasingly large bike locks. Woo hoo.

Handling bug carcasses all day? Un-sat.

Must run for now, but more to follow on Peking Duck! Talk soon kiddos!

My time in Beijing has come to end. I am typing this offline while sitting in the Beijing airport, with the distinction of being the earliest passenger to arrive for my 8AM flight. I’m unclear if the guy at my hotel has just been acclimated to Americans wanting to arrive 18 hours early for flights, but it took me a mere 40 minutes to get from my hotel room to sitting at the gate (coffee in hand). Now have 1:45 to kill.

Over the last couple days, I made it to the Great Wall, Ming Tombs, Forbidden City, and saw Tiananmen Square (but got lazy & didn’t wander around through it because it was hot hot hot yesterday and I was a sweaty dog). One notable change in my travel style over the years is a steadily decreasing sense of obligation to check the box on all the big tourist sites in a given place. I would much rather people-watch, hit some markets, explore a neighborhood vs. death march through every museum listed in Lonely Planet. (Though maybe this isn’t that much of a change—I still remember my mom’s horror when friend Leigh & I traveled to Florence and skipped the Uffizi gallery, thinking our time and money would be better spent on bread/cheese/wine at the local market.)

To that end, I spend about 1.5 hours yesterday afternoon sitting in a sidewalk café on the busy Wangfujing Dajie shopping street sipping a frosty glass of Tsing Tao and soaking in the masses walking by. It felt like watching my own Chinese TV show, with the occasional foreign extra making a brief appearance. Good stuff.

è Pic: fashion emergency

After debating a blog post entitled “I Went to Beijing and Didn’t See the Great Wall,” I capitulated Tuesday night and booked a Great Wall/Ming Tombs tour at the B&B I was staying at. I was a bit reluctant, since the itinerary outlined “tours” of the Jade Factory & Silk Museum (a.k.a. forced shopping periods where your guide gets a commission for each hapless tourist he drags through). However, this seemed to be the case with the majority of tour options & I lacked the time to find a superior option with sub-24 hour advanced planning. J (And I figured that since this was one of the few organized day tours I’ve ever done, I should really have the full bullshit tour experience.)

The tour itself lived up to expectations (low), but I will say it was worth it to see the Great Wall. The drive through the Chinese countryside/small villages was also interesting, as was our tour guide’s commentary on capitalism vs. communism. “Many businessmen are lucky. They make lots of money by being lucky. This is not good for the poor people. Here, it is better for the poor people.” Additionally, our tour bus driver performed an impressive number of slow passes on blind curves, accompanied by liberal honking at any elderly bicyclist who dared to stray into our path.

First stop was the Jade Factory. After a riveting explanation by our guide about the magic of jade, we were left to our own devices in hopes that we would drop some yuan on the outrageously priced jade items on display. Lessons learned/questions wondered:

· Which Party official did these people piss off to get stuck in the Jade-making Zoo for the day?

è PIC jade zoo

· Similarly, someone must have lost a bet to end up as the guy forced to do his work on the old-timey foot-pedal carving machine.

è PIC old timey

· The Jade Factory can be very dangerous. For instance, I was attacked by this eagle:

è PIC eagle

· And THEN I got attacked by this jaguar (or as jade-uar as they are known here):

è PIC tiger

2nd stop: Ming Tombs. Or more like Ming Tomb, #13 to be exact, and the Underground Palace. Its primary redeeming feature was its green, hilly setting:

è PIC mingtomboutside

And the amount of money that tourists have scattered around the coffin of the Emperor & his two wives.

è PIC insidetomb

Next stop: lunch! Watered down Chinese fare, anyone?? The food was unremarkable, but did allow me the opportunity for my first non-Western bathroom experience.

è Bathroom

Finally, it was time for the main attraction, the Great Wall at Mutianyu (http://www.mutianyugreatwall.net/)!! I chose this spot for my Wall visit as it seemed to combine convenient location (45 miles outside of Beijing) with a reputation for not being *as* touristy/busy/swamped with obnoxious vendors (as Badaling), but not quite as hard core as the 4-hour hike between Jinshanling and Simatai (as I lacked appropriate footwear/sportswear). Plus, it has TWO cable cars, a selling point on which friend Todd tipped me off. Having no other data points on which to base a comparison, Mutianyu lived up to expectations—it was indeed a Great Wall, cool mountain-y setting, cable cars/ski lifts galore, a TOBOGGAN return trip option, and lacking mobs of people.

And do you know how else I know that Mutianyu was the right choice? Because TONY HAWK was there too. With his posse. I mean, I’m not one to judge, but I feel like it’s getting a little awkward the way he’s following me all around China. First my international flight & now the same spot at the same tourist attraction on the same day and time…?? Coincidence? I think not. ;) Unfortunately he startled me coming out of a guard tower as he + posse were outbound & I was inbound, so all I managed to get were some paparazzi-esque photos of the back of his head & a profile that may or may not be him from a distance.

It was drizzling a bit when we arrived at the wall, so the toboggan run was closed and we had to take the ski lift back down. Upon learning of this disappointment, I thought to myself, “My mom must have been doing a rain dance in Nebraska since she would die before supporting the idea of anyone riding this”:

Anyway, you’ll just have to trust me that it was cool, since my photos all suck due to the rainy/foggy weather.

Upon our return to the minibus, our guide informed us that it would be around a 2 hour drive back to Beijing with traffic, and since that is SUCH a long time period, their tour company requires the drive to get a rest. And where we would do that rest?? Why at the Silk “Museum”, of course!! It shouldn’t need to be said that I did not make any purchases. Rather, I was too busy feeling sorry for the girl whose job it is to pull silkworm pupae out of their silky little shells all day in front of gawking tourists, and then soak/stretch the silk over increasingly large bike locks. Woo hoo.

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5 Comments on “A Visit to the Great Wall!”

  1. #1 Leah Flinn
    on May 18th, 2010 at 9:32 am

    I am willing to wager that the fashion emergency does not have a girlfriend, or the girlfriend herself is a charity case herself.

    Looks like an amazing trip, although the references to “The Party” are a bit unsettling. Very Orwellian. Yay for capitalism! ;-)

  2. #2 Steve E Rave On
    on May 18th, 2010 at 12:07 pm

    What, they didn’t take you to one the fabulous shopping areas where you can buy many famous name brands for a fraction of the retail price? You missed out on getting fancy gifts for your friends & family! We bought many high quality items for very low price – Rolez watches, Tommy Hillfinder shirts, Ralf Luren Polio, North Farce jackets, and much more.

  3. #3 Mike J
    on May 18th, 2010 at 7:36 pm

    Excellent coverage of your trip to China. I was there years ago with my daughter. The Jade factory is a can’t miss trip. Honestly, the guides will NOT let you miss it. And I love the Guinness shirt.

  4. #4 alice
    on May 25th, 2010 at 8:04 am

    went to the jade and silk factory, too… we also endured a tea pot factory and pearl factory. dad bought two silk comforters and a whopping 7 tea pots!! all probably now collecting dust at home.

  5. #5 facts about the great wall of china
    on Aug 9th, 2010 at 3:32 am

    you covered all the details of your trip in a camera…….nice activity……even you did not leave the toilet room of china…………great……………..

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