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Sparkling Wineries in Querétaro: Viva Freixenet!

Who can forget that first bottle of "champagne" you purchased from the local convenience store? ;)

I’ve shared before how I’m a sucker for well-branded tourism, so Querétaro’s efforts to promote their wine & cheese “route” certainly did not fall on deaf ears during my time in México. Even before we made our trip to Finca Vai for some cheese tasting, we drove from Mexico City to the same area in Querétaro to check out our nearby winery options.  (One has to prioritize, people.)  Cavas Freixenet was the first place to catch our eye, as I was quick to recognize the Freixenet brand name. “Aren’t they the people with that jet black bottle & trendy gold writing at a $10 price point?” I asked John.

We headed out near the town of Ezequiel Montes in Querétaro state, just north of Tequisquiapan, to visit the Mexican arm of Freixenet (the mother ship is headquartered in Spain).  I kept my expectations low, as I had observed that their website listed a number of special events happening at the winery… If I had learned nothing else from my time living in Virginia & touring its wineries, I had developed a hypothesis that there’s an inverse correlation between the quality of wines produced by a vineyard and the number of special events the vineyard has to host to sucker you into visiting & drinking its wine. :)

Once you see this sign, you have arrived in sparkling-wine-ville.

Cavas Freixenet offers free guided tours on the hour between 11AM & 4PM on the weekends, so John & I decided to check out the inner workings.

Their machinery seemed to be well-kept, in as much as I am familiar with winery equipment... (which is: not very)

Next, we descended into the bowels of the winery...

I was actually quite impressed with their cellars... massive arched brick tunnels...

...and wine stacked as high as the eye could see....

We also learned about the aging process, how they move the angle of the bottle to let the sediment collect in the neck & then be "disgorged."

After trotting around the cellars, then we headed back up to the courtyard for the real action: the tastings.  Most of their product line is available by the glass at very reasonable prices from carts in the courtyard, and then you can pop into the shop to buy any bottles you want starting at <$100 pesos.  In honor of my former days of drinking pink champagne with my roommates in Boston, I went with one of their rosé options.

This is how I was meant to live.

So how was the Freixenet wine?  Actually not half bad!  In another page from my Virginia winery experiences, I realized that enough sugar can hide a world of ills when it comes to wine…. but even their brut options were pretty drinkable.  We stocked up on several bottles of either the Petillant Brut or the Sala Vivé (my memory fails me) with an eye towards a mimosa-fueled brunch in our future, plus a few rosé for any upcoming girls’ nights out.  Definitely worth a visit if you have any sparkling wine-oriented parties coming up, as I think the bottles we bought were around $80-some pesos each.  On the way out, we verified that grapes are indeed grown here:

The vines of Freixenet in Querétaro state, Mexico

If you’re interested in a visit to Cavas Freixenet, there’s a good map on their website. But much like my prior cheese tourism post highlighted Finca Vai’s little shop in Tequisquiapan as an alternative to visiting the source, you can also experience the Freixenet wines at their shop in Tequisquiapan! During our next trip through Querétaro up towards Xilitla in February 2010, our schedule didn’t permit a winery visit, so we checked out the wine bar instead.

The Freixenet World's Wine Bar is tucked down a little side street off the main plaza in Tequis: Andador 20 de Noviembre

We enjoyed a lovely bottle of bubbly outside the bar...

Tell me where in the States you could polish off a bottle of brut + 2 orders of snacks for <$20 dollars? :)

Now in the interest of full disclosure, I will say that I don’t think all Queretaran vineyards are created equal…  We didn’t manage to visit La Redonda vineyard, but we were feeling bad about that so instead we ordered a bottle of their red wine at dinner in Tequis.  Let’s just say our group was not enthused:

The table offers a verdict on La Redonda's innovatively-named "vino tinto"

We were unimpressed and feeling like we got a bad deal, until we noticed the back of the bottle:

I think it's safe to say anyone who orders a bottle of wine whose labels aren't even applied in the right direction, shouldn't be hoping for much in the quality department.

The upside-down label perhaps should have been our first clue…

In summary, Cavas Freixenet can be an amusing day trip from DF, particularly when combined with cheese eating and photo opportunities with taxidermied birds in the entrance of a random Tequisquiapan hotel:

I always say, nothing tops off a evening of wine tasting like a stuffed ostrich.

Enjoy, and if you want to learn more about Mexican wines, check out my friend Lesley’s blog here or ask her about wine tasting tour options in Mexico City. And I would love to know– what other Mexican wine favorites have I been missing out on??

UPDATE– Check out even more wine & cheese tips from friend Alvin, who runs a B&B in Oaxaca!

Disclosure:  I am being compensated for my work in creating content as a Contributor for the México Today Program.  All stories, opinions and passion for all things México shared in my blog are completely my own.

Cheese Tourism in Mexico: a visit to Finca Vai

Cheese and dairy products in general are one of my favorite things to eat. So when I learned via Querétaro’s robust tourism board of a nearby farm that combined cheese-making with a barnyard animal petting zoo, it seemed like a no-brainer.  The fact that it was basically a simulated visit to the Midwest was just an added bonus. :)

Finca Vai is located about half an hour east of the city of Querétaro (just past the airport), or about 2 hours north of Mexico City. We were a little concerned as to whether it would be easy to find in the Queretaran countryside, but I should have had more faith:

The large Q-U-E-S-O lettering was a sure sign that we were on the right track!! (Dirty photo courtesy our windshield)

Welcome to the land of cheeeeeese, Gromit!

I love me some well-organized tourism, so I was pleased to see that tours were indeed run as regularly as promised: each hour between 11AM – 3PM on weekends, and by appointment during the week ($35 pesos/head). Their website even offers an agenda!  We started off learning about the cheese making process– this part was a little slow for us adults, but I think the kids in the group were entertained. The tour guide demonstrated the old-timey method, stirring a massive vat of murky-looking  “milk”. In a move that would make a semi-professional magician proud, the guide drew our attention to something on the opposite wall while her assistant popped out from behind a door and dumped a bunch of yellow sponges into the vat. Turn back around kids!! Cheese curds have already formed!!

Cheese-making barrel photo courtesy the Finca Vai website, as I was apparently too riveted to take out my camera during this portion of the tour.

After we learned about how wet yellow sponges instantaneously turned into plastic-wrapped cheese, we moved on to the cheese maturation zone!

Here's the cellar where cheese might have been stored to give it time to mature, in the days before better refrigeration options existed...

Finally it seemed that we had learned enough to be allowed to EAT THE CHEESE. They sat us down in a cute little roofed area with hay bales for chairs– a nice farm-y touch.

John prepares himself for a degustacion de quesos...

We got to sample 4 kinds of cheese on little branded Finca VAI plates:

I believe these were reblochon, ranchera, a panela with chipotle, and maybe a manchego?

I recall being a fan of the reblochon, as well as of the smoked provolone that they sold in the gift shop. After the tasting, we were off to discover the source of these cheeses: barnyard animals!!

First stop: the cattle! They were very willing to be petted.

Plenty of sheep were lurking around ready to offer their services.

The baby animals had their own little pens & were awaiting our arrival:

I was impressed that this girl was able to get a grip on the lamb.

John had no similar problems commandeering the same lamb.

This calf was in search of anything to suck on within a 10 foot radius.

I don't think this rabbit played an integral role in the cheese production process, but he was cute nonetheless.

And with that, our cheesery tour was over. We had the opportunity to spend more money in their store, so we snapped up some smoked provolone for the road:

All the cheese your little heart desires, available for purchase at the Finca VAI gift shop

Would I recommend the Finca VAI tour to others? If you have kiddos, I think this would be a great spot to bring the kids for an afternoon. The tour is very child-friendly, lots of opportunities to participate/answer questions/etc. (well, particularly if your child speaks Spanish).  And what kid doesn’t love petting farm animals!

For adults, the tour can be a little slow, but we were still entertained by the visit to the countryside + supporting a local business. That said, if you’re interested in sampling some cheese but aren’t a fan of sheep and cows, there’s a great alternative in nearby Tequisquiapan at the Museo del Queso y Vino. The word “museum” might be a slight overstatement, but it does deliver on Finca VAI cheeses!

The Museo del Queso y Vino offers lots of good photo opps with faux-cheese

As well as its own tasty treats!

Check out the Museo just off the square in downtown Tequisquiapan at Salvador Michaus 3 in the centro.

And as for Finca VAI, there’s a vague map on their website, but I’ve also tried to map its general location on Google + directions from Mexico City.  Enjoy your visit & México’s nascent cheese tourism industry thanks you for your patronage. 😉

Disclosure:  I am being compensated for my work in creating content as a Contributor for the México Today Program.  All stories, opinions and passion for all things México shared in my blog are completely my own.

Guayaberas: the must-have men’s summer shirt of Mexico

One excellent souvenir for any man visiting Mexico is the guayabera. To me, this is the consummate summertime shirt for men who want to look good but can’t be bothered to wear a stuffy suit. I won’t get into the historical debate about its origins, but within Mexico it originated in the Yucatan. Some Americans refer to it as a Mexican wedding shirt, and there is certainly no shortage of beach weddings that have taken place with the groom sporting one of these.

In Mexico City, I observed that guayaberas were standard slightly-less-formal attire for spring/summer wedding attendees, as well as a great option for an nice evening out. Heck, even Mitt Romney (random fact of the day: his father was born in Mexico!) has been spotted wearing them!

This light blue guayabera is one seeing regular wear by John on hot summer weekend nights here in DC.

For those of you who are residing in or passing through Mexico City, you may be wondering, “But where can I get a good quality guayabera without trekking down to the Yucatan?”  Luckily, I have your answer!  The store I’ve outlined directions to below isn’t really on the tourist circuit– it seems to cater more to wholesale business, e.g. I don’t recall seeing a dressing room, they’re not open on weekends.  However, the prices for the higher-quality linen shirts seemed as good as John had found anywhere in his searches and they have a solid selection of designs & colors organized by size for easy shopping.

If you’re in the market for gifts to bring back from your trip to Mexico & know your recipient’s shirt size, this could be even better than the 8,000 lucha libre masks we’ve distributed to 50% of our family and friends (albeit also a bit more $$). :) This store also had sizes down to 2 years old, which definitely made my list of “precious gift options for toddlers!”

Directions to a great guayabera store in Mexico City’s Centro Historico

Name: Guayaberas Yucachen
: La Academia 6, Piso 1, Centro, Mexico DF
–> just south of the intersection with Republica de Guatemala
Link to Google Maps Street View

Closest Metro Stop: Zocalo. From the Zocalo Metro, walk east on Seminario and take a left in ~3 blocks on Academia.

Phone Number: 55.5542.0537 acc to the Yellow Pages
Hours: Our vague recollections are this place was *not* open on the weekends or Mexican holidays and closes up shop by 6PM.
What else to know: lino means linen and algodon means cotton. There are also various fabric blends available. Linen costs more, but is the more traditional option.

As you walk north up Academia, look for the white GUAYABERAS sign overhead on the east (right) side of the street.

The entrance to the store (located on the 2nd level of the building) is inside this unassuming parking garage...

...and up these dingy stairs... The window displays filled with guayaberas will help you know you're on the right track!

Once inside Guayaberas Yucachen, row after row of shirts await your perusal!

In traditional Mexican retail store fashion, the salesperson will carefully follow your every move. ;)

Tell me these little guayaberas for 4-year-olds aren't the perfect gift that his mom will think is precious. (And yes, let's just ignore the fact that the 4-year-old will think it sucks because it's not a truck & you will become forever branded as the relative who always gives him clothes.)

Once you’ve made your guayabera purchase, expect to receive regular compliments on what a trendy hipster you are if you’re wearing it back in the US. If you are wearing it in Mexico or Cuba, this will not be as novel so don’t hold your breath. :) Take good care of it, and you will be able to constantly relive that beach wedding you may or may not have had!

Disclosure:  I am being compensated for my work in creating content as a Contributor for the México Today Program.  I was also invited to an all-expenses paid trip to Oaxaca as part of my role and for the launch of the program.  All stories, opinions and passion for all things México shared in my blog are completely my own.

Visiting the Alebrije Hotspot of Oaxaca

One of my favorite parts of my trip my recent Oaxaca trip via Mexico Today turned out to be the visit we made to the small town of San Martín Tilcajete. When John & I visited Oaxaca back in 2009, we’d heard from friends about all the little villages specializing in various handicrafts that are located within an hour’s drive from the city. To be honest, I was skeptical.  You’ve seen one Mexican handicraft, you’ve seen them all, right?

This is definitely not your run-of-the-mill handicraft!! I *loved* this turkey alebrije @ Jacobo and Maria Angeles' shop.

But this was before I had a true appreciation for Mexico’s many incredibly-specialized small towns. For instance, are you interested in seeing every piece of home decor that could possible be made out of onyx? Tecali de Herrera in the state of Puebla is your answer for all your onyx lamp needs! Hoping to buy as many trendy leather shoes for $200 pesos each as can fit in your suitcase? Head over to Leon in Guanajuato state, hub of all things leather (except for women’s shoes in size, ahem, 12 or 13).

So three years after being introduced to my first alebrije (including some extra-large ones scattered along Reforma in Mexico City), I was more optimistic about visiting the small town that’s bursting at the seams with alebrije action!

Oversized alebrijes seemed to escort us as we drove into the town of San Martin Tilcajete

For those wondering “what is that word she keeps using?”, alebrijes are colorful fantasy animals that are traditional folk art in both Oaxaca & Mexico City. There’s one history on the origination of alebrijes here— those in DF were papier mache, but those from Oaxaca are carved out of wood. Fellow blogger Alvin has more great detail on the unique tree that Oaxacans use for their alebrijes– the copal–and their sustainable farming practices.

A smattering of Oaxacan alebrijes

Many of my other blogger pals have highlighted the gorgeous finished alebrijes that we saw at the workshop of Jacobo and Maria Angeles. But I wanted to share my favorite part– the shelves of naked alebrijes, categorized by animal & awaiting their coats of paint to make themselves presentable to the world. :)

You can almost hear the howling of that dog with his back to the camera.

This bear was one of the more agile looking bears I've seen, and also one of the more pouty.

These guys were great-- frogs ready to party, some with guitars and other with jugs full of moonshine. (yes, I know; anthropomorphize much?) ;)

Here was one of the alebrije carvers hard at work, with a flurry of copal wood scattered around him.

The unique aspect about the alebrijes at this workshop was their amazing level of detail– like nothing I’d seen elsewhere in Mexico.

This gentleman carefully puts the finishing touches on this wacky dragon

Still a little dragon tail left to be painted, but look at that detail (not to mention, how did they carve the tail like that??).

And here's one of the amazing finished pieces.

How do I get to San Martin Tilcajete?

If you’re ambitious & are driving, Moon Travel Guides has a great, fairly detailed map of all the villages around the city of Oaxaca. You’ll take Highway 175 south from the city, and San Martin Tilcajete is about 23km out. It took us about an hour to get out there when you include some slow-moving traffic in the city + a festival of topes (killer speedbumps!) on the way out of town.

Look for this sign to mark the inauspicious entrance to the town of San Martin Tilcajete!

Alternatively, if you’re looking for a tour guide, I can only speak to the experience I had with the tour company with whom the Mexico Today folks made arrangements– Turismo El Convento de Oaxaca. Ulises Bonilla Martinez and his mother Maria Esther Martinez Ricardez both did a great job, and she in particular had the gift of story-telling that added a lot to the experience. The prices outlined on their brochure I received for various tours around Oaxaca state start from $180 pesos for half-day trips to Monte Alban or the nearby artisan villages, and $300 pesos for full-day outings. You can email info@oaxacaexperts.com for more details. If you want to do some shopping around, here’s a list of some other tour options to consider.

Finally, there is a great list here (in Spanish) of recent/upcoming events in Oaxaca, so be sure to monitor that for 2012’s Feria del Alebrije schedule as you plan your travel– you know how much I love a good niche festival!!

Disclosure:  I am being compensated for my work in creating content as a Contributor for the México Today Program.  I was also invited to an all-expenses paid trip to Oaxaca as part of my role and for the launch of the program.  All stories, opinions and passion for all things México shared in my blog are completely my own.

Upcoming Random Events in Mexico City & beyond!

As part of my continuing “Live Vicariously Through My Friends in Mexico” program, I wanted to alert y’all to some upcoming events in DF, Quintana Roo, and Hidalgo state that I thought may be worth checking out. Rest assured I continue to keep my finger on the pulse of kitschy activities despite my absence from Mexico, all in exchange for the small request of merely a few of your cheesy photos to make me feel like I was there. 😉


That’s right folks– the month of July once again brings us the annual Lucha Libre: La Experiencia!! The dates are July 23 & 24 at Centro Banamex. Have you ever thought to yourself, “I wonder what it would be like if a bunch of luchadors and lucha libre super fans got together and hung out for two days at a tradeshow that also has a professional wrestling ring set up?” Now is your chance to find out!! For fond memories of LuchaFest 2009, check out my prior post.

Recall this photo of me with a veritable "Who's Who" of up-and-coming lucha libre stars.

Their Facebook site may merit a visit, as there seem to be some hot prizes & giveaways happening in the final feverish moments leading up to the extravaganza.

El Matador is on the right, accompanied by famous "mini" luchador Mascarita Dorada. (photo courtesy El Matador)

Since you folks let me down on live reporting from the Feria Nacional de Burros (which, btw, was recently featured in the San Francisco Chronicle online!!), I have already nailed down a correspondent for this event. Friend and luchador El Matador, who has also recently relocated back to the DC area, will be flying down to Mexico City for the craziness. Keep an eye out for the gentleman on the right– if you are lucky, perhaps you can get one of his action figures, which currently is gracing my cubicle at work. I have not yet inquired as to whether El Matador will be doing any wrestling here in DC, but I feel like come election time next year, there will surely be some enterprising politician looking for a popularity boost by taking on one of the rudos…!

MEXICAN MICROBREWS: Yes, Virginia, there is a beer besides Corona in Mexico

If you ask the average person about Mexican beer, you’ll probably get an answer restricted to either the Grupo Modelo brands (Corona, Victoria, Pacifico, Negro Modelo, ) or those of FEMSA (Dos Equis, Sol, Indio, Bohemia, Tecate). But a revolution has been brewing, my friends!! (pun intended)

Mexican craft beer festival? Sold!

A number of craft breweries have emerged around Mexico, and they will have their wares on display September 1-3 at the World Trade Center in Mexico City during the Congreso Cerveza México 2011: Por La Cerveza Libre festival. You will be able to sample more than 100 beers for a mere $150 pesos/day (with advance registration)! This event is part of the Gourmet Show that happens at the same time/place– check out last year’s pics here to see if it merits a visit.

WHALE SHARK SEASON IS NOW!! Come swim next to a fish with a 6-foot-wide mouth!

Swimming with the whale sharks off the coast of Isla Holbox in Quintana Roo state in Mexico is one of those wildlife-interaction experiences that I think you have to do at least once, just like a safari in Africa, seeing the giant tortoise in the Galapagos, and visiting prairie dogs in Nebraska. John and I made it down last June & stayed at the Holbox Dream hotel (thumbs up; great air conditioning, which quickly became my main criteria for a hotel on an island in the summer).

We were too cheap to pay for a guide that took photos of us underwater, but check out my friend Joy’s amazing photos or Kelly’s story & pics on their blogs. While the average whale shark is 25 feet long, they can be up to 40+ feet in length– they are the world’s largest living fish! Even the Washington Post is getting in on the whale shark action. They’re really an added bonus to what is already a lovely beach vacation.

The view from our hotel room on Isla Holbox, Mexico

México Desconocido has further tiburón ballena details, for those who read Spanish, and if you search for “whale shark” + “Isla Holbox” or “Isla Mujeres” (the other jumping-off point for tours), you’ll find reams of additional details. In fact, el Festival del Tiburón Ballena is happening July 15-17 on Isla Mujeres.


I will caveat this alert with the fact that I know nothing about this festival in honor of grilled meats except for the announcement on the México Desconocido calendar that is backed up by the announcement on the town of Actopan’s homepageTHIS weekend, folks, in scenic Actopan in the state of Hidalgo, a meat festival (probably lamb) is awaiting your arrival. The website indicates the primary attraction at this festival is the competition to win the title of Best Barbacoyero of the Year. The word barbacoyero is not one I’ve come across before, but I will translate it loosely as “one who makes barbacoa“. :)

This photo seems to confirm the event actually exists, though according to this blog we still seem to be awaiting further details…but last year’s agenda was quite thorough!  So don’t let the silly logistical details keep you away! Commit wholeheartedly & with low expectations- this is my travel motto & it never fails. If you show up in Actopan on Saturday with the goals of eating barbacoa & meeting a talented barbacoeryo, I can almost promise your expectations will be exceeded. 😉

The 2009 logo for the Feria de la Barbacoa was the best I could find, but I felt it lends a certain air of authenticity. Also, please note the ambitious "463rd anniversary". Just think what might be in store for the 465th year!!

In summary, have a fantastic time wearing a mask to wrestle a whale shark while drinking a Mexican craft beer and eating barbacoa. What a summer Mexico has to offer!!

Shopping in the Mexico City Airport

As many of you regular readers may have gathered by this point, there are few things I love more than products with a Mexican theme and kitschy shops for hipsters. When these worlds combine, good things happen.

I certainly didn’t expect to find this combo inside the Mexico City airport. But as I wandered through Terminal 2 on Friday (en route to Oaxaca for the Mexico Today kickoff), I came across “DesignMX: diseño mexicano contemporáneo” located between the two Starbucks in the middle portion of Terminal 2.

Here's the low-key signage for the DesignMX shop at the MEX airport

The flurry of loud, colorful bags caught my eye as was trotting by in search of a sandwich.

I was drawn to the busy prints like a moth to a flame...

Everything in the store comes from local Mexican designers, or so I understood. The one pictured above is Sensacional de Diseño Grafico (their website is a bit hit-or-miss, but I do love the lucha computer bag in the lower right corner of the photo above). You can check out some more of the wares in the pics below– just click on the photos to see a larger version.

My old favorite itten is selling their laser-cut jewelry & decor, and my new favorite Rojo has some witty ceramic items.

T-shirts, bags, bowls, jewelry, and fun faux-crumpled plastic cups on that 2nd shelf down from the top in red/black/white.

I have always been tempted to purchase one of Mexico's popular chicken-shaped egg baskets, but I fear our dinner guests would be weirded out by our eggs sitting out at room temp.

I told myself that if I didn’t make any big purchases in Oaxaca (outside of the already-planned bottle of mezcal), I would make a return visit before my flight home. So on Sunday, I popped back in and purchased a wee gift for John:

This is such a Mexico City-specific gift, I couldn't help but spring for it.

If you’ve never driven a car in Mexico City, the above figurine (actually a coin bank!) will mean absolutely nothing to you. Those who have spent time driving, you should recognize an artist’s rendering of the bane of your existence- the “Viene Viene” dudes. To quote Noé’s packaging:

“Noé is one of the thousands of “Viene Viene” (direct translation: “come, come”) of Mexico City. These individuals claim the majority of free public parking spaces on the street in order to charge the person who wants to use it. When one decides to pay, the “viene viene” removes the bucket used to save the spot & begins to aid you in parking by saying “viene, viene, viene.” Noé  is the name of our character and its meaning comes from the play of words No E, which in Spanish translates to No Parking.”

“No E” is the abbreviation for “No Estacionarse.”  These guys were indeed on every street of even marginal popularity. Initially I found them infuriating– they didn’t own this street; how could they charge me to park on it! But eventually I became a fan– nothing ever happened to our car under their watchful eyes, and for a few additional pesos they would usually wash off all the DF grime by the time we returned. Anyway, this memorabilia was one I couldn’t resist.  (John was appropriately amused.) :)

If you’re entertained by the Viene Viene, I highly recommend checking out the designer’s site at www.arielrojo.com. They also have an awesome pig lamp that uses swirly compact fluorescent bulbs as the pig’s tail, and another bank shaped like a mattress.

As for the other designers at DesignMX besides Ariel Rojo, I’ve written about itten before, but you should also check out El Escobas & their Molote Art Toy, Liquen jewelry, MODO Museo, and the various other brands whose names I can’t read in my pictures. Check out DesignMX on Facebook, and allegedly a website is coming soon!

If you have more money to spend, the Tienda MAP (moda y arte popular) has some great souvenirs, but the prices are well above what you would pay at popular tourist spots like Ciudadela in Mexico City. They do have some great stuff though if you are running short on time; it is the wing with Gates 52-62.  Pineda Covalin also has some beautiful clothes & accessories with classed-up Mexican imagery incorporated into their fabrics, but be prepared to pay for the name/quality. (They have stores in both wings of Terminal 2 and also in Terminal 1.) Note- they do have an international website as well if anyone is inspired!

I do love this Pineda Covalin bag, but I think it was ~$200 dollars...

Finally, I would be remiss in not mentioning the best option for lucha libre kitsch at the airport– the Hijo del Santo store is also located in Terminal 2, but it is outside of the secure area near the food court by puerta 6. Don’t let this Christmas be the Christmas you come home without any Mexican wrestling-themed gifts for all your loved ones, people! Consider yourself forewarned, and happy airport shopping. :)

Disclosure:  I am being compensated for my work in creating content as a Contributor for the México Today Program.  I was also invited to an all-expenses paid trip to Oaxaca as part of my role and for the launch of the program.  All stories, opinions and passion for all things México shared in my blog are completely my own.


The Fields of Oaxaca

I believe it was a famous photographer who once said, “Some of the best photos this world has seen were taken from small, fogged-up airplane windows while flying over the state of Oaxaca.” Even if that’s not true, I’m still going to subject you to a photo I snapped on our descent into the OAX airport this afternoon– primarily for the viewing enjoyment of the many farmers & recovering farmers in my family. :)

Take a look at these stripey farm fields in Oaxaca state:

This looks like a modern art project, executed in crops.

The colors are a little anemic due to the multi-paned airplane window, but trust me that this flora was much more vibrant in person– particularly since the rainy season has begun in Oaxaca! I found the thin, multi-colored patches quite scenic. (Especially as opposed to my alternative view across the aisle– a man who seemed to be trying to put the moves on his airplane seat mate.)

More farm stripes! You are riveted!

It may not mean as much to those of you who are not Midwesterners & hence did not grow up viewing aerial photos of your Dad’s farm. So, check out this Google Satellite view of the farm land north of Pleasanton, Nebraska to get a sense of what an average US farm looks like. (And if you were wondering, yes, Pleasanton is home to the famous Sandbar restaurant & bar.)

Maybe this struck me today because it reminded me of the beautiful, stripey quilt that my Mom just finished for me & John, to accent our new gray/blue bedroom walls. Here it is on display still in her home:

Can you say talented quilter?? She even whipped up multiple pillows!! Go Marcia!!!

And speaking of beds (smooth transition, eh?), I was welcomed tonight after my arrival into Oaxaca by this message spelled out in leaves in my Camino Real hotel room:

John, don't get your hopes up expecting nightly love notes spelled out in cherry blossoms on our new quilt. ;)

This is how I was meant to live…but realistically I will only be living like this when Mexico Today is picking up the tab. :) Thanks to them for a great evening in Oaxaca!

Mexico Today!

My friends & family can confirm that I rarely pass up the chance to promote all-things-Mexico. Whether it be travel, food, drink, people, glassware, professional wrestling– you name it and I can probably spend an hour of your time raving about it. (Well, maybe everything except the chapulines. While I have sampled the crispy critters, I will admit to being lukewarm regarding grasshoppers from a culinary perspective…) :)

I had considerable success with my personal “Come visit us in Mexico City! Now!” campaign during our two years living there (I think we had ~25 visitors from the US?).  I may have toned down the constant peer pressure *slightly* since I am no longer there to be visited, but I still leap at the chance to “talk Mexico” when given the slightest opportunity! One of my new coworkers mentioned that her family originally hailed from Guadalajara, and I think I broke into a brief hymn of praise for Karne Garibaldi & its carne en su jugo.

I was beginning to fear that my Mexico fangirl tendencies might not have a proper outlet back here in the US… But then I received an email out of the blue from the PR firm who’s working with Marca Pais – Imagen de México to help them promote business & tourism in Mexico:
“I’m writing today on behalf of the Mexico Tourism Board’s Marca País – Imagen de México initiative, to invite you to join the Mexico Today program. The program will empower writers like you to share Mexico’s true stories with the people who need to hear them the most.  We thought that your love for travel and Mexico made you a perfect fit for the topics that we’d like to discuss on Mexico Today.”

Needless to say, this seemed like a good fit & well in-line with what I’ve been writing about on this blog for the last nearly 3 years! The México Today program will be kicking off this weekend in Oaxaca, so I am thrilled to be flying down to meet all the other folks who will also be a part of it. Several of them include longtime blog friends that I’m excited to finally meet in person- Mexico City: An Opinionated Guide, Canuck in Cancun, Countdown to Mexico, Mexico Cooks, Stay Adventurous– plus many more Mexi-fans that have a variety of interesting backgrounds.

Check out the México Today page at http://www.facebook.com/MexicoToday & let me know what you think. There will be hot action streaming from Twitter as well, and the official website is still a work in progress but can be found at http://mexicotoday.org.

In interest of full disclosure, I will be paid for the content I produce, but it will still be my opinions/thoughts/witty repartee that you’ve come to know & love (or at least tolerate)! I’m pretty excited about the program, because I think they are coming at it from the right angle: we all know that Mexico has its challenges these days, and the goal is not to hide or trivialize those issues. Instead, we hope to offer another perspective– one from folks who have actually lived, worked, and traveled on the ground in Mexico. Then you can be the judge!

Who better to promote Mexico than a girl who goes all the way to China to get her photo taken with an accented e that's as tall as she is?

I’m sure I’ll have more details after this weekend, so look forward to tales from Oaxaca plus me raving about being in the epicenter of mezcal, mole, and my favorite Mexican cheese. :)

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